August 10, 2020

      Women won the right to vote a century ago.  On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment passed.  The white women’s equal rights struggle began in 1776, though, when Abigail Adams, the wife of our second president and member of the constitution-drafting Continental Congress, sent her husband a letter.  She urged him to "remember the ladies."  She further wrote, “All men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation."...

August 3, 2020

         On the same day we learned that the US economy contracted by 9.5 percent in the second quarter of this year, the United States Senate adjourned and went home, even though the economic contraction is the largest since growth data has been collected.  They left without passing the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act.  They left without continuing the $600 per week emergency assistance for those out of work because of COVID-19.  They left without meaningful action, although another 1.434 million people had filed unemployment claims, an announcement that...

July 27, 2020

Congressman John Robert Lewis was just 17 when he reached out to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a letter conveying his desire to attend all-white Troy State College (now Troy State University) that was just ten miles from his home.  Lewis submitted an application but never heard from the college, and hoped King would help.  Instead, he went to Fisk University.  Later, Dr. King reached out to him and invited him to visit Montgomery during spring.  That was the beginning of John Lewis's relationship with King and his 60 plus ms year commitment to the civil rights movement.

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July 20, 2020

         Nero, the Roman Emperor who legendarily fiddled while Rome burned is a symbol for an irresponsible, ineffective, and callous leader who shows indifference to people in crisis.  The great Rome fire took place in the first century AD.  The fiddle wasn't invented until the eleventh century, so it is unlikely that the hedonistic emperor played the fiddle while his city was burning.  More likely, he was engaged in some trivial or sybaritic act, regardless of the crisis.

         Our 45th President puts Nero to shame.  Our country is burning,...

July 13, 2020

         At least six Black children were killed during the Fourth of You Lie weekend.  They weren’t doing anything wrong, just attending a community picnic, or going to visit a grandmother, or riding in a car with her mom.  One of the children, Secoriea Turner, 8, was an Atlantan, and the day after the killing, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, emotionally addressed the killers, “You shot and killed a baby,” she said.

 “This random wild, wild West, shoot 'em up because you can, it has got to stop. It has to stop.”  She went on to say, “Enough is enough. Y...

         The June Employment Situation report, released on July 2, showed a continued decline in the unemployment rate.  Thanks to coronavirus, the rate shot up to 14.7 percent in April and declined to 11.1 percent in June.  About 4.8 million more people were on payrolls in June than in May.  Just about every sector of the economy saw job gains, including the troubled leisure and hospitality industries.  The Council of Economic Advisors says this employment report “shatters expectations".  It represents progress in the recovery from the corona-generated recession, but I'm not sure what expecta...

June 29, 2020

 Socially isolated and alone in my home, I lifted my fist into the air when I learned that the Mississippi legislature voted to remove the Confederate stars and bars from their flag.  As NACCP President Derrick Jackson said, "it's been a long time coming."  A long time since the songstress Nina Simone put it out there with Mississippi G—damn.  A long time since Emmitt Till was massacred for "reckless eyeballing."  A long time since James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner were murdered.  It’s been a long time coming, but has Mississippi changed?

         I’m...

June 22, 2020

        According to the Washington Post, the 45th President told 19,126 lies between his inauguration in 2017 and June 1, 2020.  By now, the number has likely edged toward 20,000, as his Tulsa "rally" yielded dozens more.  This President has no allegiance to the truth, but that's no surprise.  Leading up to his ill-timed gathering, amid the coronavirus, he projected more than a million attendees.  Instead, the Trump campaign could not even fill the 19,000 seat stadium.  And because the Trump campaign ha no one to blame but itself for its spotty turnout, 45 instead blamed “bad people," the med...